Many of us have been to exotic places, hiked trails that were well off the main path, and know our way around the great cities like London, New York, and Paris. But who among us has seen more than 100 countries? When you hit that mark, you join a rare and exclusive group of travelers with the kind of knowledge that only deep experience can give.

For a refreshingly straightforward, no-nonsense look into the world of the consummate traveler, try Michael Clinton's new travel memoir, 'The Globetrotter Diaries.' In the book Clinton, a publishing executive who has been to 121 countries and all seven continents, eschews the self-obsessed first-person travel memoir and instead goes for meaty, tip-filled travel writing. In other words, this book can actually help one to become a better traveler.

Clinton has advice for everyone: Students (always take an overnight train - you may miss out on some scenery, but you'll save on a hotel bill), international travelers (think about flying on American holidays when most people stay in the U.S.), and people stuck at Heathrow (visit Terminal 5). From his vast experience, Clinton certainly adds plenty of descriptive mentions of sunsets in Shanghai and penguins in Antarctica, but ultimately focuses on the reality of travel: What to do if you leave something on a plane, and how to manage what he calls the "fine art of the business side trip."

When he's not giving advice on how to see his favorite places – everywhere from Namibia and Nepal to Paris and Shanghai – Clinton turns to his influential jet-set friends for half a dozen pages of bulleted (and surprisingly insightful) tips from the likes of Laureen Ong, the president of The Travel Channel and Louis Vuitton's Valerie Chapoulaud. What we get in the end is a bit of a rarity: A travel memoir that you'll earmark - and make use of on your next trip. [$30, glitteratiincorporated.com]