Why get rid of the bowl system now?
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The BCS (Bowl Championship Series) agreements were for four years – so every four years, the group of commissioners and university presidents got together, studied the matter, and made a decision about the future format. When the fourth BCS contract was about to expire – the one that will end after this season – the group got together and said, 'How can we make this better? What's in the best interests of the athletes and the game?' And look, many of these fans would like us to try a playoff. Can we do it and still adhere to the three principles? And it was a matter of hundreds of hours of discussions and evaluations and modeling that resulted in the decision on June 26, 2012, in the meeting of the presidents in Washington, D.C. And, oh man, it was a momentous day for college football.

These are people accustomed to making important decisions under scrutiny, and only after a long thoughtful contemplative period of study and debate, and that's what happened in our process. I think we had maybe a dozen meetings, and three times that many conference calls. You just don't take a step like this without thorough research and evaluation and debate.