We’ll soon be able to store more data than we have any business storing. The wizards at SanDisk have unveiled a prototype one-terabyte SD card. It’s sure to be invaluable to videography and photography professionals who need to store a lot of data in order to do their jobs, especially as 4K video becomes the standard.

As this is just a prototype, it’s not available to consumers yet. If and when it goes to market, it’s bound to be pricy. Previous top-of-the-line benchmarks for SD cards have been in the realm of 256 GB and 512 GB, costing around $300. As this new card significantly ups the ante, it’s only going to be more expensive. What will tech consumers do with the opportunity to harness 1,000 gigabytes in a portable format? We have a few ideas.

1. Store 500,000 iPhone photos.
Digital photographs require different amounts of space depending on what’s being captured, but you can generally expect an iPhone photo to clock in at around 2 megabytes. If you took one picture per minute for a year, you could put all of them on this SD card and still have space left over.

2. Never go to a movie theater again.
A DVD stores a little over 4 gigabytes of information. That means this single SD card could hold 250 movies (most of them starring Nicolas Cage, probably).

3. Store pretty much all human knowledge.
As of May 2015, the English-language Wikipedia is about 51 gigabytes. You could add to this millions of text-only e-books, which are consistently less than a megabyte each. You’d effectively create a modern Library of Alexandria that fits in the palm of your hand.

4. Turn your Android device into the biggest, baddest storage device ever. 
With a terabyte’s worth of new shelf space, your Android-powered phone or tablet will store practically anything. A terabyte of storage under the hood can hold twice as much data as a top-of-the-line Macbook Air.

5. Never install software on your computer again.
Check out PortableApps, a site that catalogs a suite of computer programs that run straight off of an SD card without the need to install anything at all. It includes everything from email clients to web browsers to game-software development environments. All you need is a computer that accepts SD cards.

6. Run a dual-boot system with an alternative operating system.
Suppose you want to run Linux without acquiring a new computer to do so. Your one-terabyte SD card can be configured to run Linux, but you’ll need a little technical prowess to do so. This walkthrough breaks it down step-by-step.

7. Turn it into a USB drive.
You can easily acquire an SD-to-USB adapter from Amazon or any worthwhile electronics store. Now you have a more universal solution that blows other USB drives out of the water with its storage capacity.