A Brief History of Yeti Coolers

Ask any diehard YETI fan why they make such a fuss over a cooler, and you’ll likely be met with a lengthy lecture about what makes the brand so great — and then banned from ever copping another beer from the owner of said cooler again. The maker of these high-end coolers, which can run you upwards of $1,000, have been stolen by bandits and sought out by a subculture of hedge funders and backwoods fly fishers alike. From leak-proof soft coolers that somehow keep ice cool for days to the massive Tundra 250 that makes a mean companion for sport fishing (or, you know, packs up to 155 cans with ice), the storied company has a cult-following that has slipped its way into TV shows, music lyrics, and pop culture. Here's a brief overview of the Texas brand's timeline.

2006: YETI is founded by Roy and Ryan Seiders in their father’s garage in Dripping Springs, west of Austin.

2008: The company begins selling Tundra, the signature YETI hard-shell cooler, through retailers such as Cabela’s and Bass Pro.

June 2012: New York private equity firm Cortec buys majority ownership of YETI for an undisclosed sum.

February 2014: 20- and 30-ounce Rambler Tumblers are introduced.

July 2014: The Hopper soft cooler line is introduced.

March 2015: The Colster can holder debuts.

October 2015: The 10-ounce Rambler Lowball debuts.

January 2016: 18-, 36-, and 64-ounce bottles join the Rambler series.

May 2016: YETI announces backing its first feature-length film, the survival documentary “Charged,” about Eduardo Garcia, a chef who survived a 2,400-volt shock from a hidden power line while hiking in the Montana backcountry. The film is slated for release in 2017.

July 2016: Hopper Flip 12 soft cooler debuts.