First Look: Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet

PEBBLE BEACH, CA – The Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance is ground zero for some of the world’s most peerless classics cars, but it’s also a spot where top luxury brands unveil striking new sheetmetal every August on central California’s Monterey Peninsula.

As they’ve done in years past, Mercedes-Benz debuted an egotistically proportioned concept car at this year’s event. Dubbed the Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet, this delightfully lengthy two-seater is an open-air take on last year’s low-slung coupe concept. This whimsical creation made its first public appearance at this year’s event, and proved awe-inspiring enough to become the unofficial darling of the concept car lawn.

Measuring nearly 20 feet long, this epically curvaceous two-seater is positioned as a hypothetical answer to the question of what ultra high-end personal transportation might look like in the future. For starters, the concept is (you guessed it) powered by an all-electric drivetrain. Using a total of four motors, a total of 750 horsepower is laid down to pavement, which Mercedes says is capable of hauling to 60 mph in less than 4 seconds. An underfloor battery promises over 200 miles of range, though we suspect you might score more efficiency by ditching those massive 24-inch wheels.

Electric powertrains may be the obvious answer to future propulsion, but Mercedes-Benz’s style statement is delivered with a particularly bold stroke. Sure, the Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 Cabriolet looks like it was plucked from Batman’s garage. But its real surprise is something difficult to convey in photos: the incredible intricacy of the cockpit. Though a theme of flushness carries throughout—from backlit, touch-controlled door panels, to the yacht-inspired open-pore wood floor—there’s also a sense of dimensionality in how the quilted white nappa leather seats wrap over the center of the cockpit like a handmade equestrian saddle. Added bonus: when the sun drops, the entire interior glows thanks to backlighting which illuminates the seat’s quilting, each tuft revealing a Mercedes-Benz triple pointed star.

Though this one-off can’t be bought for any cost, and it certainly takes a dramatic departure from the realm of everyday usability, don’t be surprised if production models eventually incorporate snippets of this low-slung two-seater’s design cues. Here’s to hoping we see this concept car used for the forces of good: inspiring carmakers to embrace the future through risk taking design and swift, efficient powertrains.