Lost in the Waves
Credit: John Loomis
The ocean at dawn is a wonderful dream. He thought the night might last forever and now considers the morning itself a sign, too. The birds dive to the surface, stretching out their patternless wings as if to yawn. A seagull, white and with crystal eyes, lands right next to Walt. It looks directly at him, opens its orange beak like it's trying to get him to talk. Walt can suddenly see the life of everything, the fish swimming on the surface, the actual blue of the water. His neck aches like hell. His hands and wrists are swollen stiff. His lips are chapped and bleeding. He's numb and warm. His tongue is swollen, his eyes dry.

He thinks he's floated much farther out, but he really has no point of reference. No one even knows the exact direction in which he and Christopher floated. He has survived the night, he realizes, for nothing. He stares forward, shielding his face from the sun with his arm, and then looks back down to the water, thinking of Christopher.

At 7:15 am, on the deck of a recreational fishing boat called the Open Range, Shawn McMichael looks out and sees a reflection in the water. Just turns his head, while the five other men on the deck are staring forward toward the horizon. A glitter, something sparkling, something that maybe on a thousand other days would never catch his eye. It could be anything, maybe one of the cruise-ship balloons that frequently float off the deck and then settle and shimmer on the surface. Shawn looks again and sees movement. Stanley Scott, the boat's owner, realizes it's a man. Floating. By himself, waving his arms. The boat slows, turns hard, comes within 50 feet of him.

"How did you get here?" Stanley shouts. "Where's your boat?"

The man is delirious, won't stop yelling – they can't get a word in. He asks about someone named Christopher. The men ease up to him, extend a boat pole out on the left side so he can grab onto it, and walk him around to the platform on the back end, by the engines. It takes two guys to haul him in. Dripping water, swollen, pale, shivering, jellyfish stings like long red scars on his legs. The silver pendant dangling below his chin – that's what Shawn had seen reflecting.

"I lost him!" They sit him on a beanbag in the back of the boat. "I lost him!" He repeats that phrase until they can get him to stop shouting and ask what he's talking about. "Christopher, Christopher...have you seen him? Oh, my God, have you seen him?" The men drape a windbreaker over his shoulders, hand him a bottle of water. He drinks six, one after the other. "He's a great swimmer. He's a great swimmer.... Oh, God, he's gone."

He has an amazing, preposterous story, all right. He's floated nine miles northeast into the ocean from Ponce Inlet. The men don't say a word. They're in awe. They get the coast guard on the radio and tell them they've found a man named Walter Marino, and his autistic son is still missing.

Walt shivers and sniffles in the boat. He calls his younger sister, Linda, and tells her that he's alive. The night before, Linda had not been able to sleep, knowing her brother and nephew were missing. She stayed up with her elderly mother and father, calling the pastor at the church and asking him what to do. "We're going to pray for a miracle," he had told her. Robyn and Ed stayed up too, in fear for Christopher's life, Robyn convulsing, so sick that Ed almost called 911. Angela had gone to sleep thinking about how her dad had once told her he wanted his ashes scattered, and that she couldn't remember where.

Walt tells Linda now that Christopher is still missing, that he's been in the water 13 hours.

"My God, that's a long time," she says.

He calls Robyn, too, gritting his teeth. "Tell Angela I'm alive," he says.

His voice is weak, raspy. She can barely tell it's him. "Walt?" she shouts.

"We've lost Christopher," he says.

"What? What? How? Where is he?" She's hysterical, asking about her son. She's talking so fast, asking so many questions that he doesn't want to answer, so he hangs up.

An orange-and-white coast guard boat pulls up next to the Open Range at 9 am. For an hour and a half, Walt has been sitting on the beanbag, moaning. A door opens on the side of the boat, and two men pull Walt inside. He waves goodbye to the guys on the Open Range, who stand in stupefaction.

The ship's captain asks Walt if he wants to be taken to the hospital or stay on the boat as they go search for Christopher. "Let's go," Walt says. But he chooses to sit below in the cabin, because he doesn't want to be there when someone spots Christopher floating on his stomach, bloated, dead – he doesn't want to be the one.

So he's escorted down a flight of stairs to a room filled with life jackets and flare guns. An officer in charge of keeping an eye on Walt sits opposite on a bench and says only, "You look like you regret something. Do you regret something?" Walt just shakes his head in his hands – he doesn't want to talk.