Two Iconic Brands Want to Make Your Tweed Scarf Smell Like Whisky

You might not give much thought to the gin or vodka bottles you keep around your house, but there's always the one bottle of whisky, that standby you've been drinking since the time when you graduated from mixed drinks and the cheap beer that fit your college budget, or the one your dad and grandpa drank while sitting around and talking before a family dinner. And it's the scent, maybe more than anything else, that we remember. That's what bonds us to a particular brand, even over price or taste. If we love a certain whisky, we never forget the smell. 

Johnnie Walker Black Label is one of the most perfect examples of this. It might not be as cool as some single barrel you paid a ton of money for (only to find out it came from the same distillery as a bottle that would set you back about twenty bucks), but it's the best-selling blended Scotch whisky in the world. There's a pretty good chance that unless you grew up in Scotland, it's the first one you ever smelled and possibly drank. 

Just like whisky, tweed — specifically Harris Tweed — the type that's handwoven exclusively by islanders at their homes in the Outer Hebrides, comes to mind when you think of Scotland. That's why the new collaboration between both Harris Tweed and Johnnie Walker, a "smart fabric" that both looks and has the same aroma that you get from the nose of the whisky, and the technology used means that scent will never go away. 

But maybe you don't want your scarf smelling like a glass (or several) of Black Label? Rest assured that this full range of products that will be unveiled in the near future in Berlin, then across all of Europe, won't get your bosses thinking you spent your entire lunch break at the nearest pub. Developed by the textile experts at Heriot-Watt University, the meeting of these two iconic Scottish brands will be just as subtle as a bottle of whisky cologne like you'd get from Portland General Store or the collaboration between The Glenlivet and D.S. & Durga. It's a faint scent, but enough to transport anybody back to the moment they realized they loved whisky.