The Way You Talk on Twitter May Predict Your Heart Disease Risk

 

Within Twitter’s 140-character limit, we can express our opinions, broadcast our activities, and disseminate information. But there’s something else our tweets can reveal: our risk of heart disease. 
 
Twitter, it turns out, is a better tool to assess heart disease risk than income, education, weight, and bad habits such as smoking, according to a study published in the journal Psychological Science.

Health data and tweets were analyzed from 1,300 counties across the United States. Researchers found that people who tweeted negatively, expressing “fatigue, hostility, and stress” were at a higher risk of coronary heart disease, Mother Jones reports.  Conversely, tweets expressing “optimism, excitement, ambition, and activity” were associated with a lower average rate of heart disease. 

You may guess that cursing is indicative of higher risk—and it is—but some trigger words are a bit unexpected. Want to know where your tweets fall? Take a look at these high- and low-risk words.  

High-risk Twitter language:
Passion
Hate
Despise
Drama
Liars
Bull
Fake
Faced
Burning
Damn (and quite a few colorful iterations) 

Low-risk Twitter language:
Strong
Overcome
Challenges
Faith
Trials
Endure
Opportunity
Improve
Weekend
Fantastic

Twitter is “the perfect tool for figuring out something like heart disease…people talk about themselves, [it’s] where they express their emotions candidly,” lead study author Johannes Eichstaedt, a psychological scientist at University of Pennsylvania, told Mother Jones. 

For once, it’s good to speak without a filter. Just be careful; candid tweets can monitor your risk for heart disease, but being brutally honest can still get you punched in the face.

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