How to Make a Traditional French Country Pâté

 neiljlangan

Chef Brian Howard describes pâté de campagne as a “country terrine, a rustic preparation . . . made from trimmings or inexpensive cuts of meat . . . that uses [a little] liver as a seasoning agent. . . The panade [a flour-based paste] helps retain moisture and enriches and binds the pâté. Most of the meat is ground through a large die to achieve the characteristic coarse texture.” He prefers using pork liver “because it allows you to cook the terrine to a lower final temperature and therefore produce a moister pâté.”

Brian Howard’s Pâté de Campagne

Ingredients
2 lb boneless pork shoulder butt, cut into 1-inch dice
4 oz pork liver or chicken liver
1/4 cup chopped white or yellow onion
8 tbsp coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 1/2 tbsp minced garlic
2 tbsp kosher salt
1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/2 tsp Pâté Spice (see recipe below)
2 tbsp all-purpose flour
2 large eggs
2 tbsp brandy
1/2 cup heavy cream
Optional “garnish/s”: about 1 cup total diced ham, cooked mushrooms, rinsed brine-cured green peppercorns, and/or duck confit (use 1 or more of these—your choice).

Pâté Spice
1 tsp ground cloves
1 tsp ground nutmeg
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground coriander
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tbsp white pepper

Instructions
1. Freeze all blades and bowls before gathering and measuring ingredients.
2. Preheat oven to 300°F.
3. Make the forcemeat: Grind pork through large die into bowl of stand mixer set in ice. Transfer about one-third of this roughly ground pork to small bowl; add liver, onion, parsley, garlic, salt, pepper, and Pâté Spice, and mix with seasonings. Clean blade and fit grinder with small die; grind the seasoned pork mixture into the bowl containing the plain, coarsely ground pork. Mix all and refrigerate.
4. In a small bowl, make the panade (binder): Combine flour, eggs, brandy, and cream; stir to blend. Add to ground meat mixture. Using paddle attachment of stand mixer, mix panade and meat about a minute, or until panade is incorporated and forcemeat becomes sticky. (You could use a wooden spoon or your hands instead of mixer.) Fold in 1 cup total of optional “garnish/s” of your choice.
5. Taste a spoonful. Adjust seasoning, if necessary.
6. Line a 1 1/2-quart terrine mold with plastic wrap, leaving enough overhang on the two long sides to fold plastic over the top of filled terrine (moistening the mold first will help plastic adhere to mold). Fill mold with pâté mixture (forcemeat plus folded-in garnishes), packing it down well to remove air pockets. Fold plastic wrap over the top, and cover with lid or foil.
7. Place terrine in high-sided roasting pan; add enough hot water (very hot tap water) to come halfway up sides of mold. Put pan in oven and bake about 1 hour, or until interior of pâté reaches 150°F if using pork liver, 160°F if using chicken liver. Cool, invert pan to remove pâté, and cut 1/2-inch-thick slices to serve.