A More Versatile Golf Putter

 Sarah Carson


Putters — like many of the clubs in your bag — have gone from loftless iron blades to carefully conceived alloys of exotic metals. The latest contender: Veritas Golf’s Cure Rx2, a game-changer in both look and performance on display at this year’s PGA Merchandise Show.

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It didn’t hurt that former PGA Tour Commissioner Deane Beman was manning the tradeshow booth as a Veritas vice president. Known as one of the game’s best putters in his heyday, Beman touted the center-shafted Cure’s almost limitless sweet spot — hit it off the toe or the heel and it still rolls true without an appreciable loss of distance. Made of aircraft grade aluminum and stainless steel, the rectangular bar with two round silver discs on either end makes aiming a putt seem like child’s play. The golf ball becomes the third circle that forms a triangle, amounting to a strong visual cue to make sure you hit the ball on its intended line. Alignment, according to Beman, is the amateur’s hobgoblin and the Cure Rx2 the exorcist.

Modern golfers have become used to adjustability in drivers and fairway metals, but few putters have the versatility of the Cure. You can adjust the lie (from 10 to 24 degrees) and the weight of the putter head (from 350 to 600 grams) to achieve the optimal moment of inertia (MOI), which measures the resistance of a mass to rotation. In layman’s terms, that translates into a feeling of greater stability, even on off-center strikes.

It took us a good few sessions on the putting green to get used to the Rx2, but we’ve now replaced our tried-and-true with the conversation-starting flatstick. Physics aside, we feel like we can sight a line more accurately than before, and that distance control is the only factor we need to attend to. And to suit your idiosyncratic putting needs, it comes with tools and weights. 
[starts at $270; cureputters.com]

Sarah Carson