Google Products May Be Messing Up Your at-Home WiFi

The Google Home Max sitting on a kitchen counter
 Image Courtesy of Google

Don’t be too quick to yell at your Internet provider when Netflix starts lagging tonight. Your Google Assistant or Chromecast could be at fault.

According to Gizmodo, some Google users are experiencing connectivity issues that were originally reported as existing specifically between the Google Home Max speaker and the TP-Link Archer C7 router. Now users of TP-Link routers and a whole bevy of Google smart devices are being saddled with Internet troubles.

“This issue stems from these devices’ ‘Cast’ feature, which sends MDNS multicast discovery packets in order to discover and keep a live connection with Google products such as Google Home,” explained  a TP-Link engineer on the company’s website. “These packets normally send in a 20-second interval. However, we have discovered that the devices will sometimes broadcast a large amount of these packets at a very high speed in a short amount of time.  This occurs when the device is awakened from its ‘sleep’ state and could exceed more than 100,000 packets.  The longer your device is in ‘sleep,’ the larger this packet burst will be. This issue may eventually cause some of the router’s primary features to shut down—including wireless connectivity.”

In laymen’s terms: When the Google products wake up after being in sleep mode, they’re sending too much data to for TP-Link routers to handle, so they lose performance. If you’re experiencing the problem and need a quick fix, rebooting the router to release its memory may be necessary. Shutting off the “Cast” function on Android devices may help also until a permanent fix update is made available.