A $1.7 Million Lemon? What to Know About the Bugatti Veyron Recall

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The 1,000-horsepower Bugatti Veyron, in production from 2006 to 2013, has a lot of features and details worth talking about, from its million-dollar price tag and handcrafted interior to the 268-mph top speed of the Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse.

But there’s one set of figures that’s been out of the public eye, until now: Some Veyrons need to be fixed, and Bugatti has issued a recall on many of them. Chief among them is a fuel tank sensor, as well as aluminum jack plates in the supercars that could become loose. In addition, a number of Veyrons were fitted with faulty fuel gauges. Many Veyrons had also been fitted with a potentially faulty battery cable that could corrode and catch fire, but the owners have been contacted and they have all already been fixed. 

“Bugatti is not aware of car accidents with damage to property or personal injury in any of the three cases,” a spokesperson told Men’s Journal

Just like a recall from any other manufacturer, Bugatti recalls require owners to bring the vehicles to “an authorized Bugatti partner” for repair, although the company assumes financial responsibility for travel and transport.

The fact that Bugatti is acknowledging mea culpa is proof that low-volume manufacturers are not immune from issuing recalls. In 2014, Porsche recalled 205 of its 918 Spyder hybrid supercars for an issue regarding a front axle. McLaren issued a recall for the hood latch on its P1 hypercar. Ford had to take back 448 examples of its (last-generation) GT supercar to repair a component that was subject to cracking. As a result of a number of spontaneously combusting 458 Italia coupes, Ferrari recalled over 1,000 models in 2010, committing to replacing the losses of the five sullen owners — and just last year, the Italian automaker recalled over 800 models across the lineup for improperly installed driver’s side airbags.

The recall notice is hot on the heels of the launch of the long-anticipated successor to the Veyron, the Chiron, amid a particularly sensitive moment in public disclosure by Bugatti’s parent company, Volkswagen Group.