Autumn Reading List: The 6 Best New Books of the Fall

mj-618_348_autumn-reading-list-the-6-best-new-books-of-the-fall
Bert Hardy Advertising / Getty Images


While some people live for reading books on the beach during the summertime, the colder weather brings the best new stuff and the best time to read it. New novels, biographies, and histories hit the shelves starting in September, and keep coming out until we flip past the 12th month on the calendar. And whether you’re looking for something for yourself or for somebody else, these six books should pretty much appeal to anybody. 

Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America, Jonathan Darman 
Looking for something about American politics that isn’t necessarily political, or some boring history filled with facts you could probably learn watching the History Chanel? Focusing his attention equally on LBJ’s presidency in the wake of President Kennedy’s assassination and Ronald Reagan’s ascension through the ranks of the Republican party starting at the same time, Jonathan Darman gives a clear-eyed account of how American politics got to the point their currently at without going too much into the red or the blue of either party. 

The Brewer’s Tale: A History of the World According to Beer, William Bostwick
There aren’t many books that could satisfy beer novices along with the most hardcore homebrewers, but Bostwick seems to effortlessly put the history of beer together before our eyes, and why shows why we’ve loved it for so long. 

The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, Walter Isaacson 
Walter Isaacson, who has proven himself to be one of the finest biographers working today, follows up and also adds on to his bestselling work on Steve Jobs by profiling not just one, but several of the people who contributed to making computers and the Internet part of our everyday lives. Consider this the latest classic by the guy who has a knack for writing the life stories of some of the greatest minds of all-time. 

Lila, Marilynne Robinson
It isn’t every year that one of our greatest living writers put out a new book, so that already makes the latest by this Pulitzer winning author’s latest a treat. And although the normal four or five year wait between Robinson’s novels can supply an extra amount of hype that might be hard for others to deliver, Robinson’s return to the town of Gilead keeps her streak of nearly flawless fiction going for another few years. 

Even This I get to Experience, Norman Lear 
You might pick up a Hollywood figure’s memoir for the juicy gossip or to figure out what drove an actor to pick his most famous roles, only to be disappointed with the book’s lack of substance. Hundreds of pages for just one or two nuggets can leave any reader wishing they could get those hours back. Norman Lear, who has produced some of the most important television shows in the medium’s history, is not one of those cases. The 92-year-old behind iconic shows from All in the Family to Maude delivers in spades with this book that is as much the history of television as it his own. 

A Brief History in Seven Killings, Marlon James
A novel that is as smart as it is cool, the critically acclaimed Jamaican novelist uses the 1976 attempt on Bob Marley’s life as the genesis of this ambitious novel, then moves forward to New York in the 1980s and back to Marley’s homeland in the 1990s. The result is one of the great epics of 2014. 

For access to exclusive gear videos, celebrity interviews, and more, subscribe on YouTube!